In-depth day 17: Happy helpers and bloody footprints

TAKE FIVE: Another taxi selfie as we headed back to Wits before a Highveld thunderstorm hit. Photo: Ilanit Chernick

TAKE FIVE: Another taxi selfie as we headed back to Wits before a Highveld thunderstorm hit. Photo: Ilanit Chernick

Today was spent with part of my group Rofhi, Bongi and Kudzai. I wasn’t 100% prepared for a trip to Yeoville leaving my takkies at home and my hat in the car.

As we scoured Yeoville for someone buying dreadlocks and having them twirled in for Rofhi’s video. As our day went on our hopes began to dwindle until we saw two ladies on Raleigh Street having their dreadlocks put in. One had just started and the other was going to start – Miss Shirley who was in the process of bartering for some new dreads.

We stopped them both and their hairdressers and luckily they were happy to be filmed. We filmed Miss Shirley continuing to barter for her dreads and the decision on what she wanted. We then filmed the start of the process and interviewed both her and the hairdresser.

The other lady made us laugh, “why do you leave these projects for the last minute?” She said half joking/half chastising us. After explaining how we’d been here for three weeks she finally said we could film the process.

Bongi went to help Kudzai with her stuff at the police station while I assisted Rofhi with sound and an “outsiders perspective” with filmin the hairdressers and their dreadlock patrons. We met a mom and her two small kids – a boy and girl who were fascinated with the cameras and how they worked. We showed them pictures and let them look and listen to the pictures and sound. It was super cute.

BLOODY SHOE: My flip-flop just after stepping into a "puddle" of blood in Yeoville - Yuck! Photo: Ilanit Chernick

BLOODY SHOE: My flip-flop just after stepping into a “puddle” of blood in Yeoville – Yuck! Photo: Ilanit Chernick

As we went to meet the other girls, I wasn’t watching my step and somehow managed to walk through a “puddle” of blood… yes blood. Once we got to the police station I had a mild freak out when I saw it all over my flip-flop and some on my foot. I got disinfectant and went into the bathroom of the police station – doing everything in my power not to touch it with my bare hands.

Talk about disgusting…

Once cleaned and after a short food break, Rofhi and I went to interview a lovely Rastafarian about what he thinks about the commercialisation of dreadlocks – a strong spiritual sign of the Rastafarian culture. I met his little son and had a lot of fun running around with him in the garden. We kept making funny faces and playing games with my “Highveld Lions” cap in-between doing the sound of course.

After a lovely chat where he also explained to me the connections between Jews and Rastafarian’s we headed back to Raleigh Street to film the progress and conclusion of the hairdressers and their patrons.

Our Rastafarian friend escorted us back there with his son as he didn’t feel it was “safe” to be walking around two girls alone.

We took our final shots and as the storm clouds began to gather, we realised it was time to head back or face a rain shower – all our equipment in hand. We ran to catch a taxi (my fifth one!) and made it back just before the storm hit.

Lots of walking, lots of little adventures and quite a few laughs later and an awesome partner in crime like Rofhi… all I can say is:

I’m exhausted!

Good night 🙂

Advertisements